Official Girl Scout Shoes - Part 1

 

Prior to the 1928 launch of the "official Girl Scout shoes" it appears that GS was allowing their "mark" to be used on some early shoes. No images exist, but it's noted in at least one newspaper advertisement.

In the 1928 Fall catalog the Official Girl Scout Shoe business really got started.

 

There were 2 brands, the Cantilever and the Sportster, each with only one design of shoe. It's interesting to note that these shoe ads were the first of any paid advertisements in the catalogs.

 

Other shoes were offered as early as spring of 1928, but these did not seem to have the official Girl Scout label or endorsement.

 

Various ads over the years noted that shoes designs were "approved" for Girl Scouts. The styles and designs of the shoes were tightly controlled by Girl Scouts during the first few years.

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1928F
                      Cantilever Shoes                                                A. Sandler Shoe Co, the "Sportster"     

                                         


Both shoe brands carried the Girl Scout mark on the sole
 
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A Girl Scout radio show dedicated to the Cantilever official Girl Scout shoe!

In the 1930 fall catalog there was only one "brand" of Girl Scout shoes, the Sportster, offering 6 different "styles" - which means offered in a different color( i.e. brown and light smoke)

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1930
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1930
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1931 - also seen in the 1930
GS catalog, however nothing identified it as Girl Scout.
Likely made by Firestone Footwear Co, but not verified.
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The Ped-A-Pivot Health Shoe was introduced in the fall of 1931. Although these shoes seem to be exactly the same design as the 1930's Sportster line, they were manufactured and distributed by the Brown Company and 2 other companies (combined) rather than the Sportster line. The Brown Shoe Company later becomes famous as Buster Browns.
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1931

"Price of the Sportster Official Girl Scout Shoes, 25 cents Additional West of the Mississippi"

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The Ped-A-Pivot line of Girl Scout shoes appears exactly the same as the Sportster line of Girl Scout shoes. This may have been cooperation in manufacturing. Shipping product from the east coast to the west was expensive. Having the shoes also produced in the mid-west would have helped cut down costs.

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The Girl Scout Shoe by Enna Jettick is a mystery. It advertised itself as an "Official Girl Scout Shoe", so assumedly carried the Girl Scout mark. These ads, and similar ads ran in several newspapers starting in 1931.

The Enna Jettick Shoe Company, of Auburn, New York, was successful enough to sponsor a radio program on the old NBC Blue Network, sponsored an experimental flight of Thor Solberg and the factory is well-remembered in Auburn.

1931
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1932

Firestone Footwear Company is likely the maker of the 1931 Official Girl Scout Rubber Soled Athletic Shoe too, but no maker was listed.

1932 brought the newly re-designed Girl Scout trademark

The 1932 Spring Girl Scout catalog brought 3 full page ads for shoes; the Sportster line, the Ped-A-Pivot line (that was the same as the Sportster line) and the Firestone line.

The Firestone line also was listed in the catalogs as products. Other footwear was offered too, but does not mention being official Girl Scout or touting the Girl Scout mark.

Girl Scout trademark logo is updated, and Buster Brown shoes shows its own Official Girl Scout label.

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1932
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Although touted at "new" these shoe designs had remained unchanged since their launch in 1928.

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In the 1933 Girl Scout catalog, this delightful bit of art shows off the variety of Girl Scout shoes

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In 1933 the Melanson Shoe Company enters the competition for the official Girl Scout shoe market. Their shoes are easily identified by wording on the outside of the shoe.

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1933
1935 - the brand new Mariner Girl Scout program had official shoes!
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1935 - Melanson Shoe Company offered a Mariner White Shoe, and began tinkering with the design of the basic Girl Scout shoes styles that had remained unchanged since their debut in the 1928 Fall catalog.

Always concerned about quality and the Girl Scout trademark, ads mentioned that the consumer needed to be sure they were getting Official Girl Scout shoes.

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Although not common, some stores offered an x-ray to assure the customers that the shoes were properly fitted to their Girl Scout!



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